Microorganisms in a Confined Environment – Programmed Research

  1. A01-1
  2. A01-2
  3. A01-3
  4. A02-1
  5. A02-2
  6. A02-3
  7. A02-4
  8. A02-5
  9. A03-1
  10. A03-2
  11. A03-3
Research Subject A03-3 Microorganisms in a Confined Environment
Research Group Leader
Masao Nasu
Research Group Members
  • Katsuji Tani
    Professor, Faculty of Pharmacy, Osaka Ohtani University
  • Takashi Sugita
    Professor, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Meiji Pharmaceutical University
  • Koichi Makimura
    Professor, Graduate School of Medicine, Teikyo University
  • Katsutoshi Hori
    Professor, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University
  • Takashi Yamazaki
    Lecturer, Graduate School of Medicine, Teikyo University
  • Hajime Nakatani
    Lecturer, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University
  • Kimiko Uchii
    Assistant Professor, Faculty of Pharmacy, Osaka Ohtani University
  • Tomoaki Ichijo
    Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University
  • Hideyasu Fujiyama
    Designated Professor, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University
Research Collaborator(s)
  • Toru Shimazu
    Senior Scientist, Space Utilization Department Space Life Science Group, Japan Space Forum
  • Nobuyasu Yamaguchi
    Senior Researcher, Osaka Prefectural Institute of Public Health
  • Takehiko Kenzaka
    Associate Professor, Osaka Ohtani University
  • Cho Otomi
    Meiji Pharmaceutical University
  • Mako Kawai
    Associate Professor, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Himeji Dokkyo University
  • Kazuo Satoh
    Lecturer, Teikyo University

A living environment in Space is a confined environment exposed to cosmic rays under microgravity. To date, experiments in Space have reported the alterations in the pathogenicity of bacteria, such as Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Under a simulated microgravity, the stimulation of biofilm formation has been confirmed in bacteria, such as E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as in a fungus (Candida). On the other hand, a concern has been raised over the decline in the human immunological response in a confined environment due to stress and so on. Therefore, the relationship between humans and microorganisms in Space considerably differ than that on Earth. Hence, to "live in Space" and "to live in comfort on Earth," it is essential to understand the relationship between humans and microorganisms in the confined environment as a model and accumulate knowledge that will be the foundation in order to establish a co-existence of humans and microorganisms.

Our research aims to reduce the microbial risk for a prolonged stay in Space. We will conduct comprehensive analysis of microbiota in a strictly controlled model environment to elucidate their alterations in a confined environment. Additionally, we will advance our research on microbial interactions and their adaptation strategies under microgravity. Based on these results, we plan to examine the microbial risk in a confined environment for a prolonged stay in Space.